Saturday, July 26, 2014

Bodice & skirt ensemble, ca. 1855


Bodice & skirt ensemble, ca. 1855

Corsage de robe, à manches en pagode, fermé devant par des agrafes sous patte.  (Bodice with pagoda sleeves, closes with hooks and eyes in the front beneath a placket.)

Blue moire silk

Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris



Thursday, July 24, 2014

Pomegranate Wreath or Rose & Buds, 1840-50




Rose and Buds
OR
Pomegranate Wreath,Prairie Flower


Overall Width:  73 5/16 inches

Overall Length:  111 19/32 inches

Date: 1840-50


Donor History: Quilt was made by Eleanor Euphemia Young, wife of the Rev. John Norris Young of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. Her maiden name was Eleanor Euphemia Strong, born in Newberry County, South Carolina, Jan. 19, 1823. She was married in Anderson County, S.C. Oct. 21, 1845. She died in Due West, S.C. Oct. 28, 1862 at the age of 39. Her married life was in Due West where her husband was on the faculty of Erskine College. They lived in the country, very near Due West, in a large house known as "The Young Residence." The house is still in use, privately owned and occupied by Youngs who are descendents. Eleanor E. And Rev. John N. Young had ten children, and also boarded some students of the College. Unless Eleanor E. made the quilt before her marriage, it was made in this house. If she made it before her marriage, it was made in her mother's house at Steele Creek, North Carolina, near Charlotte, or in her sister's house in Anderson County, South Carolina, where she was married. Her mother died when she was 19 and she was married at age 22. She may have lived in her sister's home for some time prior to her marriage. Information about this family is contained in the book, "A History of the Harris Family" by Mary Letitia Chalmers, published 1895. See pages 127, 128. (Mary Letitia Chalmers was the sister of the maker) Eleanor E. Young was the great-grandmother of the donor.

Amethyst Day & Night Earrings, ca. 1860






The decades of the 1860s and 1870s found the popularity of earrings on the upswing. Novelty was the name of the game and nature was in the air. The earrings of this period were meant to be amusing and have a tad touch of whimsy. These jewels for the ears were meant as an accessory for the season and typically were fashioned as such. This pair of Victorian earrings stands in stark contrast to that dictum.

Painstakingly designed and crafted with a substantial use of 14k – 15k yellow gold, these day/night earrings employ a grape cluster and grape leaf motif. The grape form was often worn a symbol of the celebration of life in a Dionysian sense. Perfect for the sotto voce of Victorian culture and sensuality.

The top surmount, which can be worn solo is a flowerhead of four (4) faceted round natural amethyst surrounding a flower-like gold center. Suspended from the top is a fitting of a grapevine and connected to a three-dimensional grape leaf form with the engraved element featuring the same design back and front. A grape cluster of eight (8) natural amethyst set in collets with serrated edges finishes the pedant day night earrings. Original back to front ear wires make for a perfectly secure fit.

Date: Circa 1860.

via Georgian Jewelry Antiques

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Wedding rings, 1865




Description:
Gold band ring, engraved inside: "F.A.T. E.H.T. May 22 1865 16K" Given to Mrs. Frederick Augustus Tallmadge (Elizabeth Hannah Canfield) on the day of her Golden wedding Anniversiary on May 22, 1865. She was married May 22, 1815.

Comment:
Frederick A. Tallmadge attended the LLS and Elizabeth Hannah Canfield of Sharon attended the LFA. The couple was married in 1815.

Category:
Personal Artifacts

Date Made:
1865

Dimensions:
3/4" D

Material:
gold

Litchfield Historical Society

Lady's gold ring, 1842



For those of you looking for examples of simpler jewelry, here you go! 

Description:
Lady's gold band, plain with bevelled edges, engraved inside "To My Mother, Augst 19th, 1842"

Comment:
One of a set of five rings owned and worn by Mrs. Frederick A. Tallmadge, (Elizabeth Hannah Canfield)

Category:
Personal Artifacts

Date Made:
1842

Dimensions:
3/4" diameter

Material:
gold





Cotton print bodice & skirt ensemble, ca. 1850




Description
A: Bodice - Purple cotton with white and purple paisley print; roller print; off the shoulder neckline; long sleeves with three ruffled tiers; hook and eye closures on back; boning sewn into lining; fabric gathered vertically in front and back B: Skirt - long, full, plain skirt; gathered at waist; new waistband of white linen tape

Comment
worn by Jane M. Wadhams Stevens of Litchfield (LFA student)

Litchfield Historical Society

Silk day dress, early 1860s



Description:
Dark brown dress with separate skirt and bodice. Brown fabric is printed silk with a small floral decoration. Full skirt that shows signs of being taken out at one time and readjusted. Skirt is accompanied by two bodices. One has long full sleeves trimmed with green silk tape. Oval neckline, cut straight down front and around waist. Front closes with hooks and eyes and nine buttons covered with green silk. Front of bodice is also trimmed in green silk tape. The second bodice is made of the same brown silk with floral print. Sleeves have been removed along with the trimmings and buttons. Various scraps of silk accompany the skirt and bodices.

Comment:
At the time this garment dates from the natural waist placement of the popular fashions combined with sloping shoulders and a full skirt to create the look of a tiny waist. By the mid 1860s, sleeves had begun to narrow from the bell shaped designs of the previous decade, and skirts became less cylindrical and more oblong with the fabric of the skirt concentrated in the back. Although many of these elements came from Europe, the American Civil War contributed stylistic details as well. For example, the teal trim on this bodice shows the inspiration from military uniforms during war time.
Provenance:

This dress was owned by Jane Wadhams Stevens. Jane Wadhams Stevens of Goshen, Connecticut was born April 5, 1815. From 1830-1832 Jane's parents, David and Phoebe Collins Wadhams, sent Jane to Sarah Pierce's Female Academy in Litchfield, Connecticut. On October 21, 1845 she married Henry Ward Stevens of New Marlboro, Massachusetts. During their marriage Jane and Henry had one child. She passed away December 11, 1862.

Litchfield Historical Society